Metal-Working Department

“The until-now detested metal-sheet took a leading position among metal materials, and it previously served as roofing material or in a production of kitchen pots. Now it serves in new creation for making the most delicate objects of the so-called art industry.”

František Tröster

In the 1933/1934 school year, 12 pupils enrolled in the newly-established Metal-Working Department led by František Knaifl. The Course was attended by students who, in their professional activity, pursued small metal industry, lighting objects, metal furniture, metal haberdashery, and advertising tinsmithing. In the following school year, František Tröster — a graduate of the Academy of Arts, Architecture & Design in Prague and architect; took the leadership of the Department. As a part of his instruction, he was also teaching about the selection of the proper metal for products in households or interior accessories and furniture.
He saw the proper utility of small utility objects in simplifying a product’s shape solutions and in the change of formation process from hammering to pressing — they distinctively accelerated production. In the 1937/1938 school year, there were changes in the staffing of the Metal-Working Department: František Tröster drew back and devoted all his energy to building a daily Window-Dressing Course. Josef Vinecký assumed the instruction in working with metals. In 1939, the Metal-Working Department had 19 enrolled pupils after the departure of Czech pedagogues, and it was again under Knaifl’s leadership.

Maroš Schmidt



“The until-now detested metal-sheet took a leading position among metal materials, and it previously served as roofing material or in a production of kitchen pots. Now it serves in new creation for making the most delicate objects of the so-called art industry.”

František Tröster

In the 1933/1934 school year, 12 pupils enrolled in the newly-established Metal-Working Department led by František Knaifl. The Course was attended by students who, in their professional activity, pursued small metal industry, lighting objects, metal furniture, metal haberdashery, and advertising tinsmithing. In the following school year, František Tröster — a graduate of the Academy of Arts, Architecture & Design in Prague and architect; took the leadership of the Department. As a part of his instruction, he was also teaching about the selection of the proper metal for products in households or interior accessories and furniture.
He saw the proper utility of small utility objects in simplifying a product’s shape solutions and in the change of formation process from hammering to pressing — they distinctively accelerated production. In the 1937/1938 school year, there were changes in the staffing of the Metal-Working Department: František Tröster drew back and devoted all his energy to building a daily Window-Dressing Course. Josef Vinecký ...

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