Ceramics Department

“We are making ceramics — a purposeful tool of a man. Ceramics is also a good base for teaching plastic creation and feeling!"
Julie Horová


Julie Horová was invited to the position of the Department’s head by Antonín Horejš as a fresh graduate of ceramics studies and decorative sculpture at the Academy of Arts, Architecture & Design in Prague. She established the Ceramics Department after returning from a study programme in France in 1931 and led it until its end in the year 1939. The lectures started in a temporary cellar space of the not yet finished building of the Vocational Schools. Horová solved the unfavourable facilities for ceramics works by cooperating with the ceramics workshops in majolica Modra where she, jointly with students, used to go during Saturdays to bake products in ceramics kiln which was missing in the School’s workshops. In the year 1933, the Ceramics Department acquired new premises and necessary equipment. Julie Horová focused lecturing on learning about prehistoric ceramics, ceramics of ancient European and non-European cultures, but also Gothic patterns. She emphasised usability. The base was ceramics with no useless decorative features, with the focus on basic clean shape using a potter’s wheel or by modelling from argil plates. There were also lessons on figural studies and portrait, mould works, and basic training in industrial production techniques. The main idea was respect towards material and its tradition, and the influence of folk pottery. The students of the Ceramics Department and their works, but also Julie Horová’s works, were regularly appearing in various exhibitions and presentations of the School in the domestic and also foreign environment. They were awarded the most prestigious prize at the Paris World’s Exhibition in 1937.

Vladimíra Büngerová



“We are making ceramics — a purposeful tool of a man. Ceramics is also a good base for teaching plastic creation and feeling!"
Julie Horová


Julie Horová was invited to the position of the Department’s head by Antonín Horejš as a fresh graduate of ceramics studies and decorative sculpture at the Academy of Arts, Architecture & Design in Prague. She established the Ceramics Department after returning from a study programme in France in 1931 and led it until its end in the year 1939. The lectures started in a temporary cellar space of the not yet finished building of the Vocational Schools. Horová solved the unfavourable facilities for ceramics works by cooperating with the ceramics workshops in majolica Modra where she, jointly with students, used to go during Saturdays to bake products in ceramics kiln which was missing in the School’s workshops. In the year 1933, the Ceramics Department acquired new premises and necessary equipment. Julie Horová focused lecturing on learning about prehistoric ceramics, ceramics of ancient European and non-European cultures, but also Gothic patterns. She emphasised usability. The base was ceramics with no useless decorative features, with the focus on basic clean shape using a potter’s wheel or by modelling from argil plates. There were also lessons on figural studies and portrait, mould works, and ...